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  • OpenGL 3.1 Released Plus New Audio Standard

    Phoronix: OpenGL 3.1 Released Plus New Audio Standard

    Nine months ago the Khronos Group released the specification to OpenGL 3.0. OpenGL 3.0 brought version 1.30 of the GL Shading Language, the introduction of Vertex Array Objects, texture arrays, more flexible frame-buffer objects, and a number of other graphical features...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=NzE2Nw

  • #2
    OpenGL 3.1 Released Plus Yet Another Audio Standard

    I hope the title says it, I am bored to tears over all these audio standards.

    I lost track over oss, alsa, phonon, pulseaudio, and what is wrapper for what and what is a wrapper for your neighbor's hot dog.

    Yohoo, here comes yet another audio standard... Sigh.

    Please, Michael, could you make an graphic overview of all audio standards released. And, which are associated with what, e.g. Gnome, KDE, xfce, etc.

    I recall an interview with Mark Shuttleworth from a few months ago where he too thought it was a mess. And, this is harming Linux, I guess. Which standard should developers follow?! They tend to be not only incompatible but also conflicting.

    I think iD software jumped on the "wrong" bandwagon several times. Linux software may die off, because of malnutrition.

    Heeeellllp, I'm drowning in silence.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by sabriah View Post
      Please, Michael, could you make an graphic overview of all audio standards released. And, which are associated with what, e.g. Gnome, KDE, xfce, etc.
      You mean this? I can't stop laughing when I look at it. It's big, chaotic, steaming pile of crap :P

      http://blogs.adobe.com/penguin.swf/linuxaudio.png

      Comment


      • #4
        My nvidia script installs 180.37.04 with -vs option. First opengl 3.1 driver from nvidia.

        http://kanotix.com/files/install-nvidia-debian.sh

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by RealNC View Post
          You mean this? I can't stop laughing when I look at it. It's big, chaotic, steaming pile of crap :P

          http://blogs.adobe.com/penguin.swf/linuxaudio.png
          That's nice, NOT!!!

          I used to laugh at the system calls in IIS vs Apache

          Compare http://blogs.zdnet.com/images/SysCallIIS.jpg

          with http://blogs.zdnet.com/images/SysCallApache.jpg

          That is horrible enough. But the Linux sound swamp is just sad.
          Last edited by sabriah; 03-25-2009, 03:05 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by RealNC View Post
            You mean this? I can't stop laughing when I look at it. It's big, chaotic, steaming pile of crap :P

            http://blogs.adobe.com/penguin.swf/linuxaudio.png

            If you follow the lines it's not that chaotic. The drawing makes it look more of a mess than what it really is. But yeah, there are way too many standards/wrappers/servers/whatever out there.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by sabriah View Post
              I hope the title says it, I am bored to tears over all these audio standards.

              I lost track over oss, alsa, phonon, pulseaudio, and what is wrapper for what and what is a wrapper for your neighbor's hot dog.

              Yohoo, here comes yet another audio standard... Sigh.

              Please, Michael, could you make an graphic overview of all audio standards released. And, which are associated with what, e.g. Gnome, KDE, xfce, etc.

              I recall an interview with Mark Shuttleworth from a few months ago where he too thought it was a mess. And, this is harming Linux, I guess. Which standard should developers follow?! They tend to be not only incompatible but also conflicting.

              I think iD software jumped on the "wrong" bandwagon several times. Linux software may die off, because of malnutrition.

              Heeeellllp, I'm drowning in silence.
              I think, I read for mobile devices, a.k.a. phones/PDA's. Why are you bothered about it? It's not like they are going to integrate that for desktop use.

              Comment


              • #8
                the "audio problem" isnt nearly remotely as bad as those people would make it out to be.. the only problem is an artificial one made up by people that dont realize "what what is for".

                theres about a trillion libraries with various abstractions for other platforms aswell, such as for winblows - does this mean its a "jungle" and "the winblows audio mess" ?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MaestroMaus View Post
                  I think, I read for mobile devices, a.k.a. phones/PDA's. Why are you bothered about it? It's not like they are going to integrate that for desktop use.
                  Ok, you saved my day!

                  I was under the impression it was for the desktop again.

                  Sorry for overreacting.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by sabriah View Post
                    I hope the title says it, I am bored to tears over all these audio standards.

                    I lost track over oss, alsa, phonon, pulseaudio, and what is wrapper for what and what is a wrapper for your neighbor's hot dog.

                    Yohoo, here comes yet another audio standard... Sigh.

                    Please, Michael, could you make an graphic overview of all audio standards released. And, which are associated with what, e.g. Gnome, KDE, xfce, etc.

                    I recall an interview with Mark Shuttleworth from a few months ago where he too thought it was a mess. And, this is harming Linux, I guess. Which standard should developers follow?! They tend to be not only incompatible but also conflicting.

                    I think iD software jumped on the "wrong" bandwagon several times. Linux software may die off, because of malnutrition.

                    Heeeellllp, I'm drowning in silence.
                    see my propose in the for a phoronix wiki with a center on graphic (and on audio, if you wish)
                    http://www.phoronix.com/forums/showthread.php?t=16155

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                      You mean this? I can't stop laughing when I look at it. It's big, chaotic, steaming pile of crap :P

                      http://blogs.adobe.com/penguin.swf/linuxaudio.png
                      Thats just sad

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        That audio tech chart is bullcrap. I could make a significantly more complex chart for almost any technology, because that chart includes driver architectures, low-level sound APIs, and high-level platform toolkits.

                        Driver architectures: OSS, ALSA.
                        pushes bits to the sound card from the user-supplied sound buffers.

                        Low-level APIs: OSS, ALSA, OpenAL.
                        userspace APIs for managing sound buffers, hardware devices, and basic effects/processing.

                        Sound servers: ESD, JACK, PulseAudio.
                        userspace sound mixing, network transparency.

                        High-level APIs: Gstreamer, Phonon.
                        advanced sound buffer management and advanced effects.

                        Toolkit-specific APIs: SDL, Allegro, GNOME's.
                        essentially just pathetic wrappers around the high-level APIs, made mostly for portability between OSes.

                        The only thing that makes it even remotely confusing is that several of the low-level APIs can also be used on top of the higher-level APIs. e.g., you can use the ALSA API to talk to PulseAudio, and an OSS wrapper over ALSA was made. This kind of crap only exists because old apps were coded directly against a low-level API instead of against a high-level API, so hacks had to be added to make those old apps go through the normal audio stream.

                        The audio chart could be draw in a FAR cleaner manner, though. The artist that rendered it was either trolling or was just flat out incompetent at drawing flow charts.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by elanthis View Post
                          That audio tech chart is bullcrap. I could make a significantly more complex chart for almost any technology, because that chart includes driver architectures, low-level sound APIs, and high-level platform toolkits.
                          That was my first thought.

                          Originally posted by elanthis View Post
                          The audio chart could be draw in a FAR cleaner manner, though. The artist that rendered it was either trolling or was just flat out incompetent at drawing flow charts.
                          Well, what do you expect from the adobe flash guys?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by RealNC View Post
                            You mean this? I can't stop laughing when I look at it. It's big, chaotic, steaming pile of crap :P

                            http://blogs.adobe.com/penguin.swf/linuxaudio.png
                            Are you kidding? The only reason it looks complicated is because the upper level abstractions (GStreamer, OpenAL, etc.) support a lot of lower level sound systems - but a lot of the APIs and sound systems are depreciated now.

                            If you take away the ones nobody uses (Allegro, Arts, ESD, ClanLib (I think - it's the only one I've not heard of) and OSS) it's actually fairly simple...

                            Pretty much, all the hardware stuff is managed by Alsa (or Jack if you're interested in higher end audio), and then there are a few different APIs that developers can choose to use.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Agreed. Pretty devious attempt to make things more confusing then they actually are. When I first switched to Linux completely, it took me about 5 minutes of research to understand the sound options.

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