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VESA Adds Adaptive-Sync To DisplayPort 1.2a Specification

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  • VESA Adds Adaptive-Sync To DisplayPort 1.2a Specification

    Phoronix: VESA Adds Adaptive-Sync To DisplayPort 1.2a Specification

    The VESA association has added "Adaptive-Sync" to the DisplayPort 1.2a video interface specification. Adaptive-Sync is a vendor-neutral way of having a dynamic/adaptive refresh-rate and similar to NVIDIA's G-Sync...

    http://www.phoronix.com/vr.php?view=MTY4ODM

  • #2
    Standards

    This is great news. It means that once DP 1.2a is out on monitors and GPUs that a lot of tearing will go away. I've had all kinds of videos and video games (mostly via Steam) tear quite a lot. On NVidia, AMD, and Intel GPUs. This being part of the standard means that any 1.2a hardware will have to support it, and that's great news for everyone.

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    • #3
      So it begins. A new age of tearless gaming. What will NVIDIA be able to offer more with their G-SYNC compared to this?

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      • #4
        Availability two years earlier than VESA?

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        • #5
          Hold off buying that new monitor until the dust settles!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by shaurz View Post
            Hold off buying that new monitor until the dust settles!
            +1. DisplayPort 1.3 is coming out soon anyways. It should have this + 8k bandwidth incorporated.

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            • #7
              I actually don't like this feature. Smoothness of animation is achieved by a constant refresh rate. Adaptive refresh rate is going to cause jittery animation.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by amehaye View Post
                I actually don't like this feature. Smoothness of animation is achieved by a constant refresh rate. Adaptive refresh rate is going to cause jittery animation.
                Apparently, it actually makes the motion so smooth that you can even read moving text: http://youtu.be/gbW9IwVGpX8?t=11m7s

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                • #9
                  I like having a 36- or 40-inch DisplayPort monitor, which is my preferred size for my eyesight. I can do 27" but I will be reading text 2" away from the screen with a bit odd squinting (27" iMac at an Apple store). With a 38.5" monitor, I can read text between 4 to 8 inches away from screen with no magnification at all.

                  It will be interesting to see what tear-free gaming is like with DisplayPort 1.2a regardless of any screen size.

                  (Typed in Nexus 7 en route to Tallahassee.)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by clementl View Post
                    Apparently, it actually makes the motion so smooth that you can even read moving text: http://youtu.be/gbW9IwVGpX8?t=11m7s
                    In that case I'm all in for that feature. Bring it on

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Vidar View Post
                      So it begins. A new age of tearless gaming. What will NVIDIA be able to offer more with their G-SYNC compared to this?
                      Do they have to do anything? It is an open standard. They don't need to sell tacked on proprietary chips for monitors when they just naturally handle adaptive vsync anyway. It is kind of like Mantle - bring out a closed arbitrary piece of shit, and motivate the open standards to get off their asses and adopt necessary technological improvements.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by zanny View Post
                        Do they have to do anything? It is an open standard. They don't need to sell tacked on proprietary chips for monitors when they just naturally handle adaptive vsync anyway. It is kind of like Mantle - bring out a closed arbitrary piece of shit, and motivate the open standards to get off their asses and adopt necessary technological improvements.
                        The hardware will require a bigger buffer and probably more processing. I would expect a 50-100$ premium to start with prices stabilizing as more vendors enter the market.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by amehaye View Post
                          I actually don't like this feature. Smoothness of animation is achieved by a constant refresh rate. Adaptive refresh rate is going to cause jittery animation.
                          You're missing the point.

                          Jittery animation is caused by the PC being unable to maintain a suitable framerate. Current fixed-framerate monitors make that worse by imposing an additional restriction on the definition of "suitable" if you want to prevent tearing. (The restriction that, if a frame is too late by even a nanosecond, it has to either be discarded or delayed until the next frame refresh.)

                          Adaptive sync makes animation better because you get the performance of non-VSync rendering with the tear-free visuals of VSync rendering.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by grndzro View Post
                            The hardware will require a bigger buffer and probably more processing. I would expect a 50-100$ premium to start with prices stabilizing as more vendors enter the market.
                            50-100$ premium seems very high to me. The requirements for Adaptive-Sync are only a new scaler ASIC and passing the compliance test (if you want to carry the logo). The cost of the scaler ASIC is only a very small part of the monitor's bill of materials.

                            Keep in mind that Adaptive-Sync has been around in the eDP standard since 2009, and it certainly didn't make laptop displays cost $50-100 more.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by grndzro View Post
                              The hardware will require a bigger buffer and probably more processing. I would expect a 50-100$ premium to start with prices stabilizing as more vendors enter the market.
                              If you mean by buffer that g-sync module, it does not need that 768MB of ram for buffer. It's there because need of memory bandwidth(used fpga altera chip needs 3 memory chips to enable full bandwidth, using very expensive programmable fpga chip(that altera cost about 800$ each) makes that price premium. Gsync will be going cheaper when asic finally comes out).

                              Adaptive-Sync sounds like a great standard(end of video tearing). To get it working monitor and graphics card have to support dp1.2a and graphics driver have to support VBI. In AMD case they will start to support it starting with gcn1.1 gpus(hawaii and bonaire no word gcn 1 cards yet). In nvidia's case I don't see reason why it could not be supported starting at kepler cards, if it's easy enough to implement in driver level addition to g-sync.

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