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Western Digital VelociRaptor WD1500HLHX

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  • #16
    Originally posted by HeavensRevenge View Post
    All of you left clinging to spinning mechanical drives are still in the stone age... guess some people just wont learn or somehow use the excuse of a steam library and need a TB to store it even though you maybe play 100GB worth of it.
    I "use the right tool for the right job" and store my primary OS etc on a 256GB SSD and I use ~120GB of it. And I store random archival stuff on an external where the data is meant to be.
    Yeah cause you know best and cause you know how I use my steam library. I guess valve was stupid for putting a terabyte drive in their steam machine? Oh and when I rip a Blu-ray to my drive that's 50gb and then batch encode several of them down to 4gb each an ssd would be just fine? Ssds are nice but they have a bunch of drawbacks. It's funny how some of you guys are getting offended that some of us like hhds.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by DanL View Post
      I so miss Samsung. They were choice disks for quiet computing. I still have a 7,200RPM 500GiB SpinPoint as my system and media drive, a 7,200RPM 320GiB SpinPoint in another system, and a 5,400RPM 500GiB SpinPoint collecting dust.
      It's not like they went anywhere, it's just that Seagate bought out Samsung's HDD division, and now their drives are labelled as Seagate.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by DanL View Post
        What is the point of making the Raptor in 2.5" form?
        Lots of enterprise drives are that size, it's for servers. It's not a laptop sized drive.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by DanL View Post
          What is the point of making the Raptor in 2.5" form?
          Because it runs hot and has to have a cooler, so it doesn't die. This cooler increases the size to 3.5". If you wanted to use a 3.5" disk instead the cooler would increase the size to the next form-factor, 5.25", which is a no go for many server cases.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by a user View Post
            hmm, is there one you would recommend for home nas usecase, at least 2 TB better 3 TB capacity?
            Well, I don't know about the person you're originally responding to, but I use WD Green 2TB's. Just make sure to disable the 5-second head parking feature (using wdidle) before you put the drives into service. If you don't, the heads park after 5 seconds of inactivity, and the drives wear out pretty fast. If you disable that "feature", they should last a good long time.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Vim_User View Post
              Because it runs hot and has to have a cooler, so it doesn't die. This cooler increases the size to 3.5". If you wanted to use a 3.5" disk instead the cooler would increase the size to the next form-factor, 5.25", which is a no go for many server cases.
              Yes and no. Lots of 1U rackmount chassis do actually support 5.25" bays, however WD actually also have models of VelociRaptor without the sink, particularly for deployment in *well ventilated* 2.5" server hdd bays. It's there more for poorly ventilated desktop chassis where a typical 2.5" to 3.5" or 5.25" bay adaptor could leave the drive in ever heating hot air or even worse, insulated by plastic.

              I use 5.25 to 4x 2.5" hot swap bays, with their own fans and the sink-less VelociRaptors, they don't get too hot.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by uid313 View Post
                SSD killed VelociRaptor.
                There is no need for a VelociRaptor, just get an SSD instead.
                Originally posted by a user View Post
                no, not even close. in theory and practice the ssds will last by far longer than any hdd.
                You both are joking, yes? Consumer SSD's have a disgustingly high failure rate. Read the reviews on Newegg and Amazon and see how many unsatisfied SSD owners are out there. Not to mention all the firmware issues. I don't have time to upgrade SSD firmware every other week, or be an un-paid beta tester for not-quite-ready products. I'm sure enterprise grade SSD's are better, but they are priced well out of average consumer budgets. If you think consumer SSD's are so reliable, ask yourself why the enterprise models include WAY more over-provisioning space, and cost so much more. Sorry, but consumer SSD's wear out way too quickly. In theory and practice, an enterprise HDD will last much longer than a cheap consumer SSD. And so long as the price per GB between enterprise HDD and enterprise SSD is so different, I'll stick with the tried and true solution. I won't be giving up my 1 TB Velociraptors any time soon... they can pull 200 MB/s, which is faster than many low-end consumer SSD's. Besides, have you priced out 1 TB enterprise SSD lately? The price/performance is no comparison.

                BTW the model reviewed in this article is an older model. NewEgg is selling this same WD1500HLHX Velociraptor for $59 and free shipping right now.
                Last edited by torsionbar28; 01-22-2014, 11:06 PM.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by DanL View Post
                  What is the point of making the Raptor in 2.5" form? Sure, it has less power consumption/heat, but it also limits storage. Anyone with half a brain would mount a 3.5" Raptor right by an intake fan. I'm guessing too many little epeen kiddies overheated their Raptors and RMA'd them which is why WD feels the need to put a huge heatsink on it.
                  It's because enterprise drives all use 2.5" platters. Even the enterprise drives that come in a 3.5" form factor actually have 2.5" platters inside them. Mainly it's because of 15k spindle speed, which is only available as 2.5" platter size. No such thing as 3.5" platter with 15k speed. So I guess they probably started making the 10k drives in the same form factor to reduce manufacturing costs.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                    You both are joking, yes? Consumer SSD's have a disgustingly high failure rate. Read the reviews on Newegg and Amazon and see how many unsatisfied SSD owners are out there. Not to mention all the firmware issues. I don't have time to upgrade SSD firmware every other week, or be an un-paid beta tester for not-quite-ready products. I'm sure enterprise grade SSD's are better, but they are priced well out of average consumer budgets. If you think consumer SSD's are so reliable, ask yourself why the enterprise models include WAY more over-provisioning space, and cost so much more. Sorry, but consumer SSD's wear out way too quickly. In theory and practice, an enterprise HDD will last much longer than a cheap consumer SSD. And so long as the price per GB between enterprise HDD and enterprise SSD is so different, I'll stick with the tried and true solution. I won't be giving up my 1 TB Velociraptors any time soon... they can pull 200 MB/s, which is faster than many low-end consumer SSD's. Besides, have you priced out 1 TB enterprise SSD lately? The price/performance is no comparison.

                    BTW the model reviewed in this article is an older model. NewEgg is selling this same WD1500HLHX Velociraptor for $59 and free shipping right now.
                    lol exactly. Thats what I think about this. If anything I would go from the raptors to SAS drives.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                      Sorry, but consumer SSD's wear out way too quickly.
                      For sure, they wear out so quickly. Oh, wait: http://techreport.com/review/25889/t...t-500tb-update

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Vim_User View Post
                        For sure, they wear out so quickly. Oh, wait: http://techreport.com/review/25889/t...t-500tb-update
                        I certainly hope that ssd lifespan has increased, I'll still wait until the are larger capacity at a lower price for servers.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by torsionbar28 View Post
                          You both are joking, yes? Consumer SSD's have a disgustingly high failure rate. Read the reviews on Newegg and Amazon and see how many unsatisfied SSD owners are out there. Not to mention all the firmware issues. I don't have time to upgrade SSD firmware every other week, or be an un-paid beta tester for not-quite-ready products. I'm sure enterprise grade SSD's are better, but they are priced well out of average consumer budgets. If you think consumer SSD's are so reliable, ask yourself why the enterprise models include WAY more over-provisioning space, and cost so much more. Sorry, but consumer SSD's wear out way too quickly. In theory and practice, an enterprise HDD will last much longer than a cheap consumer SSD. And so long as the price per GB between enterprise HDD and enterprise SSD is so different, I'll stick with the tried and true solution. I won't be giving up my 1 TB Velociraptors any time soon... they can pull 200 MB/s, which is faster than many low-end consumer SSD's. Besides, have you priced out 1 TB enterprise SSD lately? The price/performance is no comparison.

                          BTW the model reviewed in this article is an older model. NewEgg is selling this same WD1500HLHX Velociraptor for $59 and free shipping right now.
                          There were some issues on early SSDs, but I think they are long gone.
                          Modern SSD should be fine, I believe.

                          Now pretty much every SSD manufacturer use SandForce controllers, so its getting pretty tried and proven by now...

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Vim_User View Post
                            For sure, they wear out so quickly. Oh, wait: http://techreport.com/review/25889/t...t-500tb-update
                            I believe he was referring to all-out bricking, not the flash write cycles running out.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by curaga View Post
                              I believe he was referring to all-out bricking, not the flash write cycles running out.
                              As long as he has nothing more than anecdotal evidence (like "look at Newegg") his arguments are invalid.

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