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  • #16
    Originally posted by iniudan View Post
    It was the guy I was replying to that mentioned it, for personal use myself I wouldn't go lower then i3 for any use I would make of Intel CPU I can think off, but Pentium are fine for most home user and most white collar actually, basically you get similar performance then an i3 except without hyper treading and the low end integrated video of that intel generation (2500 in the case of ivy bridge, while the core series get 4000), and since most end user don't do task that hyper treading provide much performance increase, i3 wouldn't be worth it, if they plan to include a discrete GPU.
    The HD2500 core is more than enough to handle any typical non-gaming graphics load in Linux and even Windows, so there's really no need to spend good money going for an i3.

    Plus a gamer would already install a dedicated card by the way. I'm seen people play Crysis and Modern Warfare with a Pentium + GTX 570. CPU bottlenecks the system but game is still perfectly playable.

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    • #17
      Yeah, I actually bought one of these a couple months ago. If I knew they were going to have an Ubuntu version now, I would have waited. As mentioned earlier, to buy the components separately would not have been much cheaper than when I bought mine. You're paying some extra for the small form factor. Plus, most cases that size only support half height cards, whereas the x51 can take full size cards. Anyway, I enjoy my purchase.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by kenjitamura View Post
        A minimum $600 price point for a linux gaming machine doesn't look all that appealing to me atm. I think, and hope, the Valve Steambox could deliver good performance at a more attractive price point.

        Valve has said the box they want to manufacture themselves is their $300 model right? With our current pricing of parts I think we're already really close to that being an affordable and viable build for most linux gamers now. Wouldn't something like that look somewhat like this?
        A GT 640 has DDR3 (lol), to do gaming, you'd need at least a GTX 660.

        "Also $50 is a celeron price range not pentium, if you want to put down low price, pay 25$ more and get a 35W pentium instead, will have similar performance then your $50 55W celeron for lesser electricity bill."

        TDPs? Who reads them today? We're talking about $25 only, not everyone runs their computer 24/7. Just like the "80+ Gold/Platinum will make you save money on the long term" joke.

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        • #19
          From what I hear Valve have no plans to include any sort of optical drive, so you can cut that Blu-ray player out of the mix. Other partners may include one, but Gabe has said that is one of the things they are cutting out to keep the box smaller, cooler and cheaper to build and run.

          My guess is they are also assuming most people will already have a stand-alone player or other solution for disc movies in their living room, so it would be a bit of a waste to add an extra one in a gaming device that will be getting its games and system updates from the internet. Another odd thing I heard him say though was that the Steambox should have no troubles with running services like Netflix; I wonder if they are working with them on getting a proper Linux port as well.

          As far as these new Alienware options, one has to wonder just how much input Dell has into how that brand is managed now. Dell is one of those companies I will never willingly do business with after all the problems I have seen with their systems and customer service over the years while fixing and upgrading computers for friends and family.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Calinou View Post
            A GT 640 has DDR3 (lol), to do gaming, you'd need at least a GTX 660.

            "Also $50 is a celeron price range not pentium, if you want to put down low price, pay 25$ more and get a 35W pentium instead, will have similar performance then your $50 55W celeron for lesser electricity bill."

            TDPs? Who reads them today? We're talking about $25 only, not everyone runs their computer 24/7. Just like the "80+ Gold/Platinum will make you save money on the long term" joke.
            If you want to waste your power on heat production (which is what the TPD and the PSU efficiency represent) and cooling it down (which usually involve making noise), that fine with me.


            Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
            The HD2500 core is more than enough to handle any typical non-gaming graphics load in Linux and even Windows, so there's really no need to spend good money going for an i3.

            Plus a gamer would already install a dedicated card by the way. I'm seen people play Crysis and Modern Warfare with a Pentium + GTX 570. CPU bottlenecks the system but game is still perfectly playable.
            I had already mentioned that I suggested Pentium over i3 if had a discrete GPU. Has for the HD2500, knew it was enough on Linux, but since I was considering most user, I had to go with the side I am less sure about it ability to handle it while still offering a good user experience, Windows.
            Last edited by iniudan; 04-06-2013, 07:51 AM.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by kenjitamura View Post
              processor: $50, pentium

              motherboard: $50, mini-itx

              Blu-ray: $40, reader

              Case + PSU: $40, m-atx slim or m-itx

              RAM: $25, ~4 GB+

              Wifi: $15, 150 mbps N

              HDD: $45, 500 GB

              Controller: $35, Bio-feedback controller (I have no idea what this would actually cost and this is a very wishful estimate.)

              GPU: $70, Nvidia GFX ~GT 640 or better, Small Form Factor

              Linux OS: $0, =P
              50$ is two core G2020. You really want i5 if you do anything gaming. Thats 150$
              50$ motherboard is garbage pile. You really want solid-cap motherboard - Thats 70$
              BluRay reader 40$. WHY????? DVD+-RW multi. Writer. 40$.
              Case + PSU 40$. Case may cost even 10$. But PSU with 105c Jap Cap @ Silver or Gold costs 90$. Alone. Thats 100$
              Ram 4GiB 40$. Too small. Also, you get 8GiB for 40$.
              Wifi --- why? Its not notebook.
              HDD 45$, 500GB. No - 2x1TiB - 60$x2 = 120$
              GPU: $150.

              Thats mid range good gaming PC, that will not break in first 3 years.

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              • #22
                Interesting

                It's a nice gesture from Dell of all people, but I'll stick to building my own Computers. I'm pretty sure that people who use Linux seriously, usually do build their own; or at least I do. But this is great to cater to the crowd that doesn't know much about computers and the Windows fanbois that constantly cry about Linux not having any support.

                This is overkill anyway, about the most intensive game for Linux right now is Serious Sam 3, and I can run that on my 6670. By the time anything new comes out, that's intensive, I'm pretty sure this system would be less than optimal. Anyone agree with me, or not?.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Mike Frett View Post
                  It's a nice gesture from Dell of all people, but I'll stick to building my own Computers. I'm pretty sure that people who use Linux seriously, usually do build their own; or at least I do. But this is great to cater to the crowd that doesn't know much about computers and the Windows fanbois that constantly cry about Linux not having any support.

                  This is overkill anyway, about the most intensive game for Linux right now is Serious Sam 3, and I can run that on my 6670. By the time anything new comes out, that's intensive, I'm pretty sure this system would be less than optimal. Anyone agree with me, or not?.
                  Actually a GTX 660 is perfect for Serious Sam 3, it let you go with ultra graphic and get a good 75 FPS at 1920x1080 and 60 FPS at 2560x1600, which are usually the target frame rate for more action based game, for thing to stay smooth and fluid, for most other type of game, I admit your fine with 30 FPS. (In good part why my 5670 endure, since mostly play strategy, I wish I had bought a 1024MB model instead of a 512MB, has the memory is mostly what bottleneck my GPU when I try to play the more graphically intensive title)

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Calinou View Post
                    A GT 640 has DDR3 (lol), to do gaming, you'd need at least a GTX 660.

                    "Also $50 is a celeron price range not pentium, if you want to put down low price, pay 25$ more and get a 35W pentium instead, will have similar performance then your $50 55W celeron for lesser electricity bill."

                    TDPs? Who reads them today? We're talking about $25 only, not everyone runs their computer 24/7. Just like the "80+ Gold/Platinum will make you save money on the long term" joke.
                    35W pentium doesn't make lower electricity bill than 55W celeron/pentium.

                    PC with Gold PSU has approx. 5 watts lower power consumption than with Bronze PSU.
                    AC Input at 64 Watt DC output
                    Seasonic Bronze - 81 Watt
                    Seasonic Gold - 76 Watt
                    http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1297-page3.html
                    http://www.silentpcreview.com/article753-page4.html

                    In case
                    PSU Seasonic S12II 380 Bronze - 53 Euro
                    PSU Seasonic G360 Gold - 63 Euro
                    1 kWh - 0.2 Euro
                    8 hours per day 365 x 8 x 0.2 x 0.005 = 2.92 Euro per year
                    12 hours per day 365 x 12 x 0.2 x 0.005 = 4.38 Euro per year
                    Gold PSU will save money after 2.28 or 3.42 years

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by brosis View Post
                      50$ is two core G2020. You really want i5 if you do anything gaming. Thats 150$
                      50$ motherboard is garbage pile. You really want solid-cap motherboard - Thats 70$
                      BluRay reader 40$. WHY????? DVD+-RW multi. Writer. 40$.
                      Case + PSU 40$. Case may cost even 10$. But PSU with 105c Jap Cap @ Silver or Gold costs 90$. Alone. Thats 100$
                      Ram 4GiB 40$. Too small. Also, you get 8GiB for 40$.
                      Wifi --- why? Its not notebook.
                      HDD 45$, 500GB. No - 2x1TiB - 60$x2 = 120$
                      GPU: $150.

                      Thats mid range good gaming PC, that will not break in first 3 years.
                      i5 isn't necessary for gaming.
                      $10 case will be crap. Non-crappy case costs $80 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16811352026
                      PSU Seasonic G360 Gold costs $60 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817151117

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by JS987 View Post
                        35W pentium doesn't make lower electricity bill than 55W celeron/pentium.

                        PC with Gold PSU has approx. 5 watts lower power consumption than with Bronze PSU.
                        AC Input at 64 Watt DC output
                        Seasonic Bronze - 81 Watt
                        Seasonic Gold - 76 Watt
                        http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1297-page3.html
                        http://www.silentpcreview.com/article753-page4.html

                        In case
                        PSU Seasonic S12II 380 Bronze - 53 Euro
                        PSU Seasonic G360 Gold - 63 Euro
                        1 kWh - 0.2 Euro
                        8 hours per day 365 x 8 x 0.2 x 0.005 = 2.92 Euro per year
                        12 hours per day 365 x 12 x 0.2 x 0.005 = 4.38 Euro per year
                        Gold PSU will save money after 2.28 or 3.42 years
                        Considering that all computer I ever owned, except that the current main PC at a point in time, were always used for over 6 years, it saving like I said. And TDP is part of energy efficiency, for it is the power dissipation, a low TDP CPU will require lesser power input then a CPU of similar performance with a higher TDP, has less energy is wasted on resistance.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by iniudan View Post
                          Considering that all computer I ever owned, except that the current main PC at a point in time, were always used for over 6 years, it saving like I said. And TDP is part of energy efficiency, for it is the power dissipation, a low TDP CPU will require lesser power input then a CPU of similar performance with a higher TDP, has less energy is wasted on resistance.
                          CPUs with lower TDP don't have lower power consumption

                          Total Benchmark Power Consumption (Watt-hours)
                          Core i3 2100T - 19.2
                          Core i3 2100 - 18.5
                          Core i5 2400S - 15.9
                          Core i5 2400 - 15.5 (14.5)
                          http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1202-page6.html

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by JS987 View Post
                            CPUs with lower TDP don't have lower power consumption

                            Total Benchmark Power Consumption (Watt-hours)
                            Core i3 2100T - 19.2
                            Core i3 2100 - 18.5
                            Core i5 2400S - 15.9
                            Core i5 2400 - 15.5 (14.5)
                            http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1202-page6.html
                            You do know your comparing benchmark power consumption to execute to execute a list of benchmark, which the higher performance CPU will execute faster, thus been under load for a lesser amount of time, thus explaining why they consumed less power. The thing is that most systems are never under heavy load 100% of the time (especially most home and office desktop), thus why there is the nice average power consumption graph right under it, oddly enough the 35W TDP processor is beating everyone.
                            Last edited by iniudan; 04-06-2013, 12:25 PM.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by iniudan View Post
                              You do know your comparing benchmark power consumption to execute to execute a list of benchmark, which the higher performance CPU will execute faster, thus been under load for a lesser amount of time, thus explaining why they consumed less power. The thing is that most systems are never under heavy load 100% of the time (especially most home and office desktop), thus why there is the nice average power consumption graph right under it, oddly enough the 35W TDP processor is beating everyone.
                              Average power consumption graph is misleading.
                              In case of idle there is only 1W difference, video playback 2W difference.
                              http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1202-page3.html

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by JS987 View Post
                                Average power consumption graph is misleading.
                                In case of idle there is only 1W difference, video playback 2W difference.
                                http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1202-page3.html
                                And if you go to the two next page you will notice that that the 35W TDP CPU consume about 7.6W less then the next CPU under heavy load, the thing is that it take longer period of time to execute the benchmark test.

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