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  • #46
    Originally posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
    That would be because it's an ultrabook which you should know better than to get anyway. Standard consumer grade notebooks such as the HP dv6 don't really have this problem, and it sounds like the business laptops are in a better position than those, and no despite Intel's attempts Ultrabooks are not the way of the future, as is shown by just how hard they've been flopping.
    Problem with the non-ultrabook laptops is that they're big, bulky, noisy and fuggly.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
      Meh, im still pissed at myself for buying a whole lot of 10 Intel mini PCIe wifi cards (i just love Intel's WiFi cards) last week only to find out that my Aspire S3 uses a soldered down WiFi chip.

      Now what am i supposed to do with those 10 Intel cards?
      Simple solution. Go NUCin futz! There's gonna be a bunch of Intel NUCs coming out in the next few months and you can use some of them to throw together your own and sell/trade the rest for various parts.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by uid313 View Post
        Problem with the non-ultrabook laptops is that they're big, bulky, noisy and fuggly.
        Not really. Six years ago, sure. But not today. I see nothing but sleek and slim notebooks that weigh a fraction of the models I sold in retail several years ago, even at the 17-inch market segment.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by AJenbo View Post
          The windows version is still 50,- cheaper
          It's the other way around.

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          • #50
            In my mind, "quality" means "lasts for the next decade, tough enough you can stand on it or drop it on the floor without worrying, and it doesn't make your hands hurt using it or your eyes hurt seeing it." There is also the component of the hardware working reliably.
            Lasts for the next decade: I had a Thinkpad 600-series that died in 2009 (manufactured in 1999), and from what I hear that's less than average. How do Macbooks compare to that?
            Tough enough to stand on or drop: I've done that several times with both my Thinkpads. In contrast, my Aspire One popped open falling off a low bed...
            The real top-notch one here is a Panasonic Toughbook, IMHO.
            Hands hurt/eyes hurt: I'm looking at Acer's keyboards and trackpads, and the Pavilion's general feel of plastic that might well break soon.
            Hardware works reliably: Some Acers actually comes out tolerably well here, in my experience. On the other hand, if I could ask Lenovo one question it would be what possessed them to use Realtek wireless (though it does work well now).

            But in general, I think that the Thinkpads come out pretty well. From what I hear, Macbooks don't when you include how long they keep working properly.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Luke_Wolf View Post
              That would be because it's an ultrabook which you should know better than to get anyway. Standard consumer grade notebooks such as the HP dv6 don't really have this problem, and it sounds like the business laptops are in a better position than those, and no despite Intel's attempts Ultrabooks are not the way of the future, as is shown by just how hard they've been flopping.
              I'm not going to touch a Lenovo or HP notebook with an 800m-long pole simply because they use a BIOS / UEFI whitelist that blocks the system from booting if you insert in a non-whitelisted WiFi card.

              And my Intel cards I purchased are not those that are in the Lenovo / HP whitelists: those would cost a lot more than the generic Intel card of the same model.

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Sonadow View Post
                I'm not going to touch a Lenovo or HP notebook with an 800m-long pole simply because they use a BIOS / UEFI whitelist that blocks the system from booting if you insert in a non-whitelisted WiFi card.

                And my Intel cards I purchased are not those that are in the Lenovo / HP whitelists: those would cost a lot more than the generic Intel card of the same model.
                Well it's not like they're the only OEMs in the world, and let's be completely honest here... ALL of the OEMs are crap in some way or another, and basically you have to evaluate to see which OEM has the least crappy product for your needs at the time you're evaluating a new purchase, because the laptop market has not opened up to builders yet and thus you can't have an actually good product.

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